About


For more information about my research, please visit my research page or download a full version of my curriculum vitae.

I am a doctoral candidate in the Management of Organizations Department at UC Berkeley's Haas School of Business. My research examines the role of emotion, cognition, and culture in shaping social networks and labor market outcomes. Much of my work is situated in organizational settings, where I examine the microfoundations of workplace inequality. 

My dissertation examines how gender dynamics influence the expression of emotions in the workplace and the consequences of these emotion displays for network formation and change. In my job market paper, I unpack how women and men engage in different kinds of emotional labor to connect with their colleagues through the process of linguistic alignment. I do so using a unique data set that includes over 400,000 email message threads exchanged among 688 people over 6 years in a mid-sized technology firm. 

In another paper (which recently received a "revise and resubmit" decision at American Journal of Sociology), I investigate the role of race, criminal record, and recent exposure to violent crime in shaping employers' hiring decisions. This paper contributes to our understanding of the role of social context—in particular, the time and place of violent crime events—in employers' decisions to call back job applicants for an interview.

Although grounded in sociology and organizational theory, my work integrates theoretical insights from social psychology and sociolinguistics. My research methods are similarly diverse, ranging from experimental studies in the lab to audit studies in the field to computational approaches applied to large archival data sets.

Prior to my PhD, I worked in finance in the U.S. and U.K. I also hold a Master of Public Policy from UC Berkeley's Goldman School of Public Policy and a Bachelor of Science in Finance from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.